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Hall of Fame by Name
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Michigan Water Industry

Hall of Fame


Inductees by Name
 



Louis Ayres of Ann Arbor

Jack Borchardt of Ann Arbor

Edward Dunbar Rich of Lansing

John F. Dye of Lansing

George Fenkell of Detroit

Eugene Glysson of Ann Arbor

Clarence Hubbell of Detroit

William A. Kelley of Lansing

Thomas Newhof of Grand Rapids

Gerald Remus of Detroit

Donald K. Shine of Wyoming

Ervin Stahl of Michigan

Charles Van Der Kolk of Zeeland

Dual Entry: T.L. VanderVelde and John Vogt of Michigan

Gardner S. Williams of Ann Arbor






Louis Ayres of Ann Arbor

1886 - 1973
Year Inducted: 2013

Born in a small coastal town on Lake Huron, Louis Ayres was a civil engineer who left an indelible mark on the water profession. Ayres contributed to countless projects throughout his career, introducing innovative solutions to the challenges of the day. During the initial years with his firm, Ayres, Lewis, Norris, & May, he inspired the centralized water source model used by Detroit and its surrounding communities. At the time, it was the largest regional supply system in the country. He continually studied water rate structures and was instrumental in defining the first manual available through the American Water Works Association, ultimately becoming known as an authority on the financing and rate structures of water systems. His philosophies on rate structure were the springboard for modern rate structure theory.






Jack Borchardt

1916-2006
Year Inducted: 2014

Dr. Borchardt was born in Newton, Iowa in 1916. In 1948, he joined the University of Michigan faculty as Assistant Professor. He was instrumental in developing the Sanitary Engineering course of study, including the laboratory which is now the Environmental Engineering Laboratory. He was named Professor in 1960 and Professor Emeritus in 1982.

In 34 years at U of M, he was conducted productive research in both the water and wastewater fields, including studies in chlorination and filtration. He wrote more than 30 major technical publications. He also  organized and edited proceedings from seminars on filtration, viruses and trace contaminants as well as sludge and its ultimate disposal. He chaired the doctoral committee of 18 successful PhD candidates.

Dr. Borchardt applied his knowledge to the design and construction of several water treatment facilities in Michgian. He was also in demand as an advisor to government and industry as well as lecturer in many other states and countries.

He was an active member of AWWA/Michigan and served on several committees at the state and international level. He was part of the group that revised the AWWA Manual of Practice. Michigan Section/AWWA awarded him its highest honor, the George Warren Fuller Award in 1969. The semi-annual conference on water treatment is named in his honor.

He left a legacy of hundreds of well-prepared students, significant research, quality publications and an undying interest in improving the environment.







Edward Dunbar Rich

1868 - 1950
Year Inducted: 2014

Edward Dunbar Rich known to many as the “Colonel” a nick name he was given as a result of receiving a Lt. Colonel’s commission in the Reserve Officer Corps in 1923. Colonel Rich, as he was known to many was quite proud of his service in World War I. Col. Rich was born in Marcellus, New York in 1868. In 1908 he was appointed Assistant Professor of the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Michigan teaching municipal engineering, hydraulics and water supply engineering. He continued teaching until 1913 when he left the University of Michigan to become a Sanitary Engineer for the State of Michigan Board of Health. He is best remembered for his contributions to Public Health through drinking water. An award in his name recognizes individuals for twenty five years of “meritorious and faithful’ service to the water profession.











John F. Dye of Lansing

1896 - 1966
Year Inducted: 2013

 A graduate of Purdue University, John Dye spent his career at the Lansing Board of Water and Light. He was an accomplished chemical engineer and brought creative thinking to the treatment processes used in the Lansing water system. Dye contributed to design improvements for equipment (adopted by a number of manufacturers) and increased efficiency in chemical treatment. He served on the State of Michigan Board of Examiners for Certification of Water Treatment Plant Operators as well as the Michigan Conference of Water Purification. He shared his knowledge through his professional memberships and was published numerous times in professional journals for his research and innovate approaches.









George Fenkell

1873-1949
Year Inducted: 2014

George Finkell’s name is inextricably linked to the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department. He served as Manager from 1918-1928. Several facilities in the water system as well as a street in Detroit are named for him. It is said that he invented some of the equipment that was used in the system. Those who knew him said he would never bother to get a patent for any of them.

He was born in Chagrin Falls, Ohio in 1873. He wanted to be an engineer and enrolled at the University of Michigan. However, he had to drop out after the first year because he didn’t have the money to continue. In 1926, the University of Michigan awarded him a retroactive Bachelor of Science in Engineering nunc pro tunc – now for then.

He went to work at DWS in 1893 as a draftsman and later became Chief Draftsman.  After six years as an engineer with the City of Erie, PA as a civil engineer, he returned to Detroit. He became the Commissioner of Public Works in 1913 and in 1918, he was promoted to Superintendent and General Manager of DWS. During his 10-year tenure, the service area was extended well beyond the city limits and the population served increased from 900,000 to 1.8 million. 

In addition to his engineering achievements, he was a Lt. Colonel of Engineering in the US Army Officer Reserve Corps. He was also active in professional organizations and served as President of AWWA 1923-25. He was awarded honorary membership in 1940.










Eugene Glysson

1926-2014
Year Inducted: 2015

Dr. Grissom was born in Montpelier, Vermont. In 1951, he joined the University of Michigan faculty as  an Instructor in the Civil Engineering Department. He retired as Professor in 1974 and was named Professor Emeritus in 1995. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he also served as advisor for the Municipal and Public Works graduate programs. In 1977, he was called to active duty as an officer in the US Public Health Service, assigned to the Land Protection Branch.

He also served as special consultant and researcher to the World Health Organization, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Michigan Department of Public Health and the National Science Foundation. In 1973, he was visiting lecturer at the University of Guyana under the auspices of US AID. From 1974-1978 he served as external examiner for the Civil Engineering Department. 

He was the author of more than 20 papers presented at conferences in this country and abroad. Topics included: groundwater protection issues, regulation of point of use devices, the technology of point of use devices. He was co-author of a comprehensive water quality survey comparing the quality of water from municipal taps and major brands of bottled water.

Dr. Glysson was a long-time member of AWWA and in 2002 received the Michigan Section’s highest honor, the George Warren Fuller award.









Clarence Hubbell

1870 - 1950
Year Inducted: 2014

Clarence W. Hubbell is best remembered in Detroit for his many contributions to the state of the art in wastewater treatment that has tended to overshadow his contributions to drinking water, which have been no less impressive. Clarence W. Hubbell was born in Cole County, Missouri. He earned his Civil Engineering degree from the University of Michigan in 1893 and secured employment as a draftsmen for Detroit. Prior to opening his own engineering office he served as Engineer-in-Charge of the Manila water supply. Detroit Mayor Oscar B. Marx offered the position of City Engineer to Hubbell, which he accepted on the condition he be allowed to continue in private practice. He was a member of the Chicago Sanitary District, the body responsible for the reverse flow of the Chicago River. He was awarded the ASCE’s Norman Medal along with George Fenkell and Gardner S. Williams for their publication; Experiments at Detroit, Michigan, on the Effect of Curvature upon the Flow of Water in Pipes. He proposed using concrete for the construction of large diameter water and sewer tunnels that ran him afoul with several brick manufactures. They had him arrested on trumped-up charges and he spent a short time in jail. Within a short time, the use of concrete in tunnel construction became the norm. Sadly, he died in an auto accident on February 1950. The firm he established almost 100 years ago; Hubbell, Roth and Clark, Inc. is currently led by George E. Hubbell II, President and fourth generation successor of the founder. 







Gerald Remus

1908 - 2003
Year Inducted: 2014

Gerald Remus known as “Gerry” was born in Reed City, Michigan. He received his Bachelors Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Detroit Institute of Technology and his Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan.  He started to work for the City of Detroit in 1930 in their Public Lighting Department. Four years later he moved to the Department of Water where he stayed until his retirement. He did not like lawyers and was called: direct, blunt, flamboyant, acerbic, bombastic and many others far less polite; however, after he took over the reins “everyone was effusive and uplifted”. The Lake Huron plant in Fort Gratiot was to be the crowning glory of Gerald Remus. On December 11, 1971 twenty two men died from a methane gas explosion in the Lake Huron Tunnel. Years later Gerry said “I think I died a little during that time”. He retired in 1973 after 43 years with the City of Detroit. 




 

 

William A. Kelley of Lansing

19?? –
Year Inducted: 2016

Bill graduated from the University of Iowa with a BS in Civil Engineering in 1960 and then spent two years in the Army.  He returned to the University of Iowa to earn an MS in Sanitary Engineering in 1963.  After graduation, Bill started his career at the Michigan Department of Public Health Division of Water Supply, where he eventually served as the Division Chief.  He was instrumental in expansion of the Division staffing as a result of the Safe Drinking Water Act.  Bill served as the Michigan Department of Public Health representative on the Certification Advisory Board of Examiners.  During his time as Chief, the joint Department of Public Health and Michigan AWWA Section training program expanded greatly, with the introduction of the Gull Lake and Higgins Lake Short Courses, the Cross Connection Seminars and the development of a new format for conducting Spring and Fall Regional meetings, among other training initiatives.  The early and first requirements for continuing education for certified operators began during Bill’s watch.  After retiring from the State in 1988, Bill started another career as a consultant and worked for Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr and Huber until 2005.  Bill was instrumental in promoting the potential use of microfiltration within the firm.  Soon after, the City of Marquette selected microfiltration for their 7 MGD plant, which at the time was the largest microfiltration plant in North America.  Throughout Bill’s career, he urged people he met within the industry to become active members of AWWA and the Michigan Section.  Bill led by example and served as Michigan Section Trustee, Chair and Director and was a Vice President of AWWA.  Bill received the Faust, Fuller, and Gold Water Drop awards.  Bill is also an AWWA Honorary Member and received the Outstanding Service to AWWA Award.  Bill is currently enjoying his well-earned retirement in the Lansing area.  Please give a round of applause for Bill Kelley.

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Newhof of Grand Rapids

19?? –
Year inducted: 2016

Tom earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics from Calvin College and then attended the University of Michigan, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1960 and a Master of Science degree in Sanitary Engineering in 1961. Tom worked at Williams and Works in Grand Rapids for 8 years, when he and Ed Prein started Prein&Newhof in 1969. Tom’s sound engineering principals, honesty, propensity to see farther, and business acumen were instrumental in growing Prein&Newhof into a successful business that today employs over 120 people at seven locations. Tom has been very active in AWWA for more than 50 years; he has served as Trustee and Chair and participated on numerous committees. Many of his employees trace their involvement in the Michigan AWWA Section to Tom, as he would typically ask them which committee they were planning to join, giving both encouragement and a gentle nudge. While Tom’s list of achievements in the Section are long, including receiving the Faust, Fuller, and Borchardt awards, his biggest impact on the Section was his work in starting the Joint Expo. Tom is still employed at Prein&Newhof, although he will tell you that he is “retired,” which really means he is working part time. Don’t feel slighted that you haven’t been invited to his retirement party; he hasn’t had one. In his spare time, Tom shares his insights and wisdom with students through his active involvement with the Engineering Departments at both Calvin College and the University of Michigan. While working full time he was also an adjunct professor at Calvin College for 5 years. He continues to mentor students directly, and he promotes and financially supports civil and environmental engineering research and instruction at both of his alma maters. He is active in his church and volunteers his time with several non-profits, including a pre-K through 8th grade school he helped to start. Tom has been married to his greatest encourager and cohort Greta for 56 years and enjoys time with his five children, 11 grandchildren, and his great grandson, Thomas. Please give a round of applause for Tom Newhof.







Donald K. Shine of Wyoming

1929 - 2003
Year Inducted: 2013

Donald Shine began his water career in Big Rapids. He was always actively seeking excellence and innovation in his work. While the Water superintendent for St. Joseph, Shine conducted extensive testing on dual media filters, which contributed to several Michigan communities and other communities in the Midwest using this type of media. This configuration is still widely used. Shine went on to Wyoming where he served out the remainder of his career, first as Water Superintendent and then as Director of Utilities before retiring in 1990. Having joined Wyoming just after the construction of its first surface water treatment plant, Shine built the department and the staff from the ground up. He required his operators to obtain the highest classification possible in the State of Michigan. After methane regulations were enacted in the early 1970’s, his was the first water utility lab in Michigan to purchase equipment, implement training for staff, and get certified. An active member of the profession and of his community, Shine has left a legacy of excellence and continued improvement to which all water professionals should aspire. Shine served as president of AWWA International in 1979.











Ervin Stahl

19??-2010
Year Inducted: 2015

Erv graduated from Purdue University in 1950, majoring in Agricultural Engineering. Erv worked for Layne Northern and Layne Western Companies for 41 years, specializing in locating and developing ground water supplies for municipal, industrial and agricultural use and retired as Eastern Regional Vice President. In addition to a full work life, Erv was involved in several veteran organizations and was the editor and publisher of the USS Roy O. Hale News for 19 years. But Erv didn’t stop there. He was very involved in the Section and was Section Chair in 1970 and National Director from 1983-1986. He has received many AWWA awards, including the George Warren Fuller Award and Honorary Member Award. Erv was THE Section historian for many years and his impact can still be experienced today when you review the Section archives. Erv died at the age of 85 on January 18, 2010. Please give a round of applause for Ervin Stahl.





 

 

Charles Van Der Kolk of Zeeland

19?? –
Year inducted: 2016

Chuck attended Grand Valley State College in 1972, but after a few years, realized that college was not a good fit for him and decided to apply for work at the Zeeland Board of Water and Light in 1974.  After 42 years at the Zeeland BWL, both Chuck and the City are very happy he made that decision.  Chuck began his career as a water technician and was steadily promoted to Water Supervisor, a position he still holds today. He is a licensed water operator, holding an F-4 and an S-1.  Chuck has played many roles in support of water, from a sumo wrestler to a regulatory advocate to a public communicator.  While he is often noted for keeping the water profession entertained, there is no doubt that he is a serious and passionate promoter of the water industry.  Chuck joined AWWA in 1985 and decided to get involved in committee work.  Thinking he may not be selected to a committee, Chuck decided to play the odds and he signed up for all of the committees.  After the third or fourth committee chair contacted him to join their committee, he realized his mistake.  Once he became active on ONE committee, Chuck’s involvement in AWWA grew, joining more committees, then serving as a committee Chair, and next rising through the Board of Trustees where he eventually served as Section Chair.  He advanced to Director and then Vice President of the Association.  He was active in Association committees, councils, and technical advisory work groups.  Overall, Chuck has served on over 30 committees or work groups and has taken leadership roles on at least 10.  And he is not done yet as he is still active in both the Section and the Association.  In addition to his AWWA service, Chuck has been involved in other Civic organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce.  He is perhaps best known for serving over 30 years as a volunteer Church youth leader and being a mentor and friend to many high school kids as they traveled on over a hundred mission trips, many outside the US.  Chuck has accomplished all of this while representing a small community water system.  While his system may be small, his heart is large and his passion for the water profession is tireless.  It is an honor to nominate such a well-qualified candidate who has served – and continues to serve – the water profession with dedication and intelligence.







Dual Entry: T.L. "Ted" VanderVelde and John Vogt

Ted: 19??-20?? and John: 19??-20??
Year Inducted: 2015

T.L. “Ted” VanderVelde and John Vogt. Ted and John are former employees of the Michigan Department of Public Health. They were both responsible for setting the atmosphere of cooperation between the State of Michigan drinking water regulatory program staff and the public water systems. Our operator certification program history, coupled with the training offered by the State and in cooperation with AWWA is one shining example. Ted and John were directly responsible for Michigan's status of compliance with the basic need to provide complete treatment for surface water sources, long before EPA had a hand in it, and with no "variances and exemptions". Ted and John were very forceful in setting employment requirements. Their insistence upon engineering skills and advanced degrees were another reason for Michigan’s good compliance numbers. The "sanitary survey" was an institution in Michigan long before the Safe Drinking Water Act and it only became part of the Safe Drinking Water Act because of the push from the states. Back then, most of the states were "Michigan followers" in setting up sanitary survey programs; the ideas being conveyed through our participation with other states in regional and national associations.

John Vogt was the Chief of the Bureau of Environmental Health and an extrovert - very outspoken and aggressive with everyone, including his own department administration, his staff, Public Water Supply managers, local health departments, and the public. He would sell public health to anyone who might listen. He was a critical member of the Water Resources Commission - the one most members looked to when a critical decision on pollution control was needed. His public presence was "commanding" to say the least. Of course, that approach only works when you are very intelligent and your decisions are almost always on target.

Ted was the Chief of the Division of Water Supply and more of a "mentor" - showing endless patience with staff and with problems that would arise in his job. Ted was a delegator - he would be clear on what was wanted and needed, but then he would turn his staff loose and let them figure out how to get the results. Of course, that is not easy when one has a lifetime of experience and you are training and mentoring new young staff as the PWS program expanded.

Many descriptors apply to both men: highly educated, highly trained, highly experienced, dedicated to public service, treated others with respect, set high performance standards, etc. Both men are AWWA Fuller Award winners and both were Honorary Members. Ted is the longest serving MI-AWWA Secretary-Treasurer. Many people's careers were influenced by them, and their impact on the Michigan Water Industry still persists today.













Gardner S. Williams of Ann Arbor

1866 - 1931
Year Inducted: 2013

Gardner Williams was born and raised in the Saginaw area. He began working in the water industry even before he graduated from the University of Michigan. After his graduation in 1889, he moved to the Russel Wheel and Foundry Company of Detroit and from there on to the Board of Water Commissioners for the city of Detroit. He played a key role in pinpointing the source of the 1895 typhoid fever outbreak in Detroit. Several years later, Williams began teaching at Cornell University. It was there that he teamed up with Allen Hazen and together they developed the Hazen Williams equations for head loss in water conduits. Williams returned to Michigan several years later to teach at his alma mater. While there, he designed his first repeat arch dam. As his notoriety increase so did demand for his consulting service. He decided to leave teaching and open his own firm in Ann Arbor – now Ayres, Lewis, Norris, and May. Williams spent his career innovating and teaching and left a lasting legacy.

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